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Full text of "Curryer"

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http://www.archive.org/details/curryer1971unse 



T^Vllp Of CnnfPtlfQ Cuny College Library 

laDie 1^1 ^OnieniS 1071 Blue HIH Avenue 



Dedication 11 

Student Life 14 



Parents' Weekend 32 

Homecoming 40 

Winter Weekend 72 



Administration & Faculty 57 

Seniors 108 



Who's Who 62 

Graduation 142 



Athletics 



Football 22 

Basketball 50 

Hockey 89 

Baseball 94 

Tennis 100 

Golf 102 



Organizations 31, 66, 68, 

71, 78, 80, 
82, 84-88, 98 

Advertising 150 

Spring 1970 160 




f 




Published Annually By The Students 

Of Curry College 
Milton, Massachusetts 




Buried In The Red And Gold 



Leaves Of New England . . . 



OTH 





Is An Area Defined By Signs 
And Maps As Curry College . . 




SOUTH 
CAMPUS 




CURRY COLLEG 

MILTON, MASSACHUSETTS 




Retaining The Tradition 
Of The Old And 
Developing The New 



And Whose Future 
Is Witnessed 
By Construction 




Made Up Of Students 
Whose Faces And 
Emotions Are The 

Essence Of Our Existence 






THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES and THE PRESIDENT 

TAKE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING 
THAT 

CURRY COLLEGE 

WAS ACCEPTED FOR MEMBERSHIP IN 
AND ACCREDITED BY 

THE NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIATION 
OF COLLEGES AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

ON DECEMBER 4, 1970 




■H 



ENDING 




"A Fleeting Moment 




// 



Frozen In Our Memories. 



IT M 1 




THE SEMEM CLASS Off IW1 WBSM TO DEDICATE THE IWt CURRYER 
TO DEAN CECIL H. ROSE KM HIS E3GMT YEARS OF DEDICATION TO 
CURRY COLLEGE. 



. The Future Of 



WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS YOUR GREATEST 
ACHIEVEMENT IN YOUR LIFETIME? 



to that involvement on the part of the students and on the 
part of adults as well. 



Probably the greatest achievement if my lifetime is work- 
ing with young people both through college and through 
Church. To see the progress of these young people and 
what they can do when they commit themselves to a goal 
and the satisfaction that comes when we see them achieving 
those goals, even though this achievement may be spread 
over a period of years. 

BEING A MINISTER, ARE YOU IN FAVOR OF ALL 
THE CHANGES GOING ON IN YOUR CHURCH AND 
IN OTHERS? 

Yes, quite so, the church has been sort of a stagnant insti- 
tuition for a number of years. I think, on the ecumenical 
side, all churches and all faiths have given inspiration to 
each other. We see the need of doing things together with a 
common background. 



IF YOU COULD CHOOSE ANY OTHER PROFESSION 
BESIDES WHAT YOU ARE NOW, WHAT PROFESSION 
WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY? 



I think that if I were choosing another profession, though 
I am pretty well satisfied, it might be a guidance officer in a 
high school. I seem to see the need of this very much. As 
students come to see a Dean of Students, or if they come to 
ask about financial aid, it doesn't seem like they are always 
getting the information that they should have had say two 
or three years before or at least a year before they came to 
college. 



WHAT RELIGIOUS FIGURE, PAST OR PRESENT, 
HAS IMPRESSED YOU THE MOST? 



IF YOU COULD LIVE IN ANY PERIOD OF TIME, 
EITHER PAST OR FUTURE, WHAT PERIOD OF TIME 
WOULD YOU PICK AND WHY? 



Oh, right now is the most thrilling time to be alive and to 
be doing something. 



WE KNOW THAT YOU ARE A PROFESSOR, AD- 
MINISTRATOR AND A MINISTER, WHICH PROFES- 
SION HAS GIVEN YOU THE MOST SATISFACTION? 



I think what I am doing right now, a combination of two 
things, is most satisfying. It is working with students on the 
college level and also working with young people at the 
church level. Many college students are involved in religion 
in some way or another and the church has got to come up 



I think outside of biblical figures, the man most inspiring 
to me is Albert Schwitzer. He has made a tremendous con- 
tribution by bringing medicine, philosophy and religion al- 
together and inserting human needs with his tremendous 
background. 



DO YOU THINK WE SHOULD REFORM OUR EDU- 
CATIONAL SYSTEM STARTING FROM THE GRADE 
SCHOOL ALL THE WAY UP TO THE COLLEGE LEVEL? 



Yes, but I think probably like everyone else that I don't 
know just where reform shall begin. Talking with three 
other educators in my family, there is certainly need for re- 
formation. Many things will have to be tried before any one 
approach or approaches will be found that will really be 
meaningful. It seems to be a period of experimentation in 
education. 



College Looks Good 



DO YOU THINK THAT THE CAMPUS TURMOIL IS 
OVER OR JUST BEGINNING? 

I think if we use the word turmoil, it isn't over. But 
neither is it beginning. I think the strong issues have been 
brought out. We are sort of settling back to a level as to 
how they are going to be worked out in a much saner atmo- 
sphere and environment in which we do it. 

DO YOU THINK THAT THE STUDENTS SHOULD 
HAVE A GREATER SAY IN COLLEGE POLICY UKE 
HIRING PROFESSORS? 

Students may well make appraisals of class procedures 
and professors which they have. That will some how guide 
those who have direct responsibility of hiring professors and 
instructors. 

WHAT ONE EVENT IN YOUR LIFETIME STANDS 
OUT MOST PROMINENTLY? 

I suppose the most thrilling event was, after years of 
studying in college and in the seminary, was ordination into 
the Christian ministry which took time, which took commit- 
ment and also a personal decision. And when those deci- 
sions were made, there was a sense of satisfaction which 
one only experiences once in a lifetime. 

HOW WOULD YOU SUM UP YOUR YEARS AT 
CURRY? 

They have been growing years, all eight of them. When 
you look back to what Curry was and what it is now, I don't 
think that many faculty or students appreciate the struggle 
we went through to get to our present position. It is really 
thrilling to be a part of those eight years. 

WHAT FUTURE DO YOU SEE FOR CURRY 
COLLEGE? 

With what we have achieved, the future looks good. I 
think we got an inkling, through admission, of the students 
interested. The fact of accreditation also helps us to attract 
attention from a larger geographical area. The future looks 
best now, at least during my stay at Curry College. 




STUDENT 



LIFE 



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; Charge! 




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Curry Crushes 
W. Conn., 55-7, 
Behind Carabba 

NEW HAVEN — Curry Col- 
lege rolled up the most impres- 
sive victory in its football his- 
tory yesterday, crushing West- 
ern Connecticut College, 55-7, 
with quarterback Mike Carab- 
ba passing for four touch- 
downs. 

Carabba's scoring aerials 
covered 31, 71, 35 and 74 yards. 
John Keough, a freshman from 
Rockland, caught the first 
touchdown pass and also tallied 
on a 32-yard run. 

Keough wound up with 200 
yards rushing. 



Curry 



18 15 15 7—55 



Connecticut 7 0— 7 

C — Keouah 31 pass from Carbabba 
(kick failed); C— Crowttier 71 pass from 
Carabba (kick failed); C — King 1 run 
(kick failed); C— Keough 32 run (King 



74 pass from Carabba (King 
kick); C— Soep 43 run (Sansone pass 
from Ahern); C — Ahern 1 run (King 
kick). 






23 




*£**' «&ft 



DEFENSE 





MAINE MARITIME 
The Colonels opened their 1970 season against Maine Maritime 
on ohe Colonels home field. The team was paced by Mike 
Carrabba , who ran for one touchdown and threw for two while the 
defence held Maine Maritime immoble all afternoon. The final 
score was 34-0 Colonels. 

WESTERN CONNECTICUT STATE 

With one win under their belt the Curry Gridsters traveled to 
Danbury Conn., to play Western Connecticut State. The Colonels 
went through the game like there was no tomorrow scoring 12 
points in the first quarter, and 15 points in the fourth quarter. 
Western Connecticut scored their only point in the third period on 
a blocked punt. They were successful with the extra point and the 
final score was Curry 55, Western Connecticut 7. 

MONTCLAIR STATE 

Curry's first loss of the season came against Montelair state. 
The loss was one that could not have been prevented. The 
Montelair team was just stronger than the Colonels. Coach 
McKeown said "We're not discouraged about the loss, they came 
into the game with a great reputation and they showed us why. 
They took advantage of the few mistakes we made and that's one 
of the things that makes them great." The final score was 
Montelair 35, Curry 0. 

TRENTON STATE 

, This game was one that should never have been lost, but was. 
The Colonels put the first two touchdowns on the board and then, 
because of some mistakes, they let Trenton score. The score at 
the end of the first half was Curry 13 Trenton 14. This was the 
first time that the Colonels were trailing in the game. The third 
quarter saw the same action as the first with the Curry Gridsters 
scored a n eight point play with the score 21-14 Curry. In the fourth 
quarter disaster struck as the Trenton team, after tying the score 
in the end of the third quarter, scored again, making the final 
score Trenton 28, Curry 21. 



BRIDGEWATER 

Parents Weekend saw the Curry Gridsters take an impressive 
win in front of the Parents of the Curry students and also saw 
them take the New England Small College Conference. The 
Championship came from beating all of the teams in our 
Conference. The 18-0 win was truly deserved by the team. 

PLATTSBURG STATE 

The Curry football team after having won the New England 
Small College Championship traveled to face Plattsburg state in 
upstate New York. The Plattsburg team was composed of mainly 
upperclassmen while ours was mainly freshmen. The final score 
was 6-0 which showed that the Colonels defense was equal to their 
job. 

NICHOLS 

After having tied Plattsburg the Curry Gridsters traveled on 
their last road game of the year to play Nichols College on their 
home field. Te Gridsters needed this win to give them a better 
than 500 season. Late in the third period the score was tied at 7-7 
and with the desire to score the Colonels scored, made the score 
13-7, and finished the game with the bestrecord that the team has 
ever had. 

BROCKPORT STATE 

The 1970 homecoming game for Curry was held against 
Brockport State. Thegamewas a tough one for our team, playing 
before our fans and me returning Alumni. Thegame resulted in a 
loss for theHome Gridsters by a score of 24-0. 



JERSEY CITY STATE 

The final game of the 1970 football season was played against 
perhaps the best team that we faced all season. The game against 
Jersey City State resulted in a loss with the final score 6-0. The 
Colonels played their best game of the year. Had a call by the 
Refs. thatseemed like none of the Refs. knew what happened had 
not been called against the Colonels we would have scored a 
touchdown, may have made the extra point and had a good 
chance to win the game. 



Interfaith — Big Brother, Big Sister 








^ 


1 ' 1 








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r 

rl 




All College Forum 



We, the members of the Honor's House of Curry College, in order to achieve a closer rapport be- 
tween all individuals at Curry College, propose that a Student, Faculty, Administration Forum be es- 
tablished. Its purpose will be to establish a better understanding of the controversial problems facing 
this college. We feel that there are many questions being left unanswered and problems unsolved. Our 
sincerest wish is that all will share in our concern, in order that today's dreams at Curry become to- 
morrow's reality. This, we feel, can only be accomplished by opening more channels of communica- 
tion. Hopefully, this Forum will help us to reach that goal. 




A Once Defunct Club 




Rejuvenated 




James Verdon — President 
Robert Kenney — Vice President 
James Curren — Committees Chrmn. 



Carol Faust — Treasurer 

Barbara Matthews — C. Secretary 

Paula Cloutier — R. Secretary 



Newman Club 




Student Senate 

1st Row: Dr. Kieghton (Advisor), Helen Archer (Secretary), Willard Horn (Vice President), J. Bruce 
Flaig (President), Michael Stone (Treasurer), Loraine Paige (Secretary), Joseph Ventrone (Advisor), 2nd 
Row: Joseph Zang, Debbie Perelli, Joyce Margolis, Carol MacDonald, Diane Larrier, Thomas Butler, 
Richard Steiner, 3rd Row: Steve Centore, Barry Sneider, Donald Mitchell, George Reid, Ross Kirk, Ed 
Romaine, Donald Cohen, Timothy Garvey and John Lee. (Pictured Above) 





Parents Weekend 



October 16, 17, 18, 1970 Registration - Coffee 
hour — Reception — address by President Hafer 
and Co-Chairman Joyce Margolis and Dean 
Morgenstern — then the Student-Faculty Forum 
— a success 




; jirrf i 




''Are Radical Students 7 Methods Justified?' 




THETAS PRESENTS 



DAVID KIMBALL & JOSEPH SCHNEIDER 



in 



Edward Albee's 



THE ZOO STORY 




Characters: 

Peter JOSEPH SCHNEIDER 

Jerry DAVID KIMBALL 



Scene: 



The story is laid in Central Park, 

New York City 

(A Sunday afternoon) 



Artistic Director. ..........THOMAS MARTIN 



Production Coordinator - Stage Manager - Technical Director 
PETER EWALD 





c 

u 

R 
R 
Y 



GARTER BOWL PLAYERS 1970 

Bubba Bork 
Big Cat Abeles 
Choo Choo Cain 
Beasty Benson 
Speedy Cohen 
Little Boolittle 
Tiger Esposito 
Body by Fisher 
Stretch Gardiphe 
Ducky Jaffe 
Show Howe 
Loco Losano 
Jet Stream Loiselle 



Mauler Miller 

Mudeye McDonald 

Needy Nenniger 

Joe Willie Naiman 

Robot Robinson 

Fire Redwood 

Rocky Rosen 

Snuffy Smith 

Alka Sietzer 

Tommy Gun Thompson 

Wonder Wade 

Zombie Zaen 

Hitting Harding 



P 

u 

R 
I 

T 
A 

N 
S 





OEX's 1970 Garter Bowl saw Curry Puritans lose a hard fought battle to LaSall 
Junior College. The score was 0-6; but cheer up girls we will WIN in 1971. Lt. 
Col. Goodin said, "The annual Garter Bowl is growing more popular each year 
and the toys and donations collected at the gate will help to make a Christmas 
happier time for needy children in the Boston area. So we lost but WE WON a 
more important game." 




STUUtiiN l'TDEWSTET- OI U Utttt I UULLLUt 



HOMECOMING '70 



in concert 






v \ *% 



j. geils 



open to general public 



friday, november 6, 1970 / 8:00 p.m. 
curry college south campus auditorium 
1071 blue hill avenue, milton 
(formerly Jeanne d'arc academy entrance) 



Saturday, november 7/ 8:00 p.m. 'til 
at ken harrelson's boston "1 800" club 
tickets $ 8.00 per couple /weekend 
package deal: $ 12.00 per couple 



in concert 



INot Open To Public) 



for ticket info call 3330315 or 333-0500 x 361 





Hey! A Parade — A Marching 
Band - With Floats - And 
Pretty Girls — A Game — A 
Concert — A Dance — A 
Time To Remember With 
Friends. 






* ifidm- 





An Enjoyable Evening 






46 



Earth 
Song 



Cultural 



A play will be presented next 
Tuesday that will involve every 
member of the audience, in that 
it will question man's survival as 
a joyful being on the Spaceship 
Earth. 

"Earth Song", a total-involve- 
ment experimental drama spon- 
sored by the American Friends 
Service Committee, will be pre- 
sented in the Little Theater. 

Through a series of dramatic 
episodes and original songs, the 
Earth Family Theater Troupe 
mirrors the underlying feeling 
and dilemmas of contemporary 
America — violence, youth- 
parent polarization, population, 
"superpatriotism", alienation. 

The "Earth Family" is not 
only a theater troupe, but an 
expanded "family" of seven 
adults and three children who 
are still evolving a life-style that 
reflects their convictions about 
human nature. The professional 
actresses and actors who make 
up the troupe are united in their 
desire to use their skill to bring 
people together by working for 
positive social change and recon- 
ciliation. 



Also — the Marathon Players 
from the Marathon House in 
Providence, R.I. A rehabilitation 
center for drug addicts, they put 
on an emotion-packed tear-laden 
performance. The audience re- 
sponded likewise, with a standing 
ovation. Pictures on right. 




Lord Caradon, who was 
appointed Minister of State for 
Foreign Affairs and Per- 
manent United Kingdom 
Representative at the United 
Nations when Mr. Harold 
Wilson formed his government 
in October, 1964, and held these 
offices until the Labor 
Government went out of office 
in June, 1970, will speak here 
on Thursday, October 22, at 
8: 15 p.m. under the auspices of 
The Cultural Affairs Forum of 
Curry College. 

Lord Caradon was created a 
Life Peer on his appointments 
to those posts and chose the 
title Lord Caradon of St. Cleer 
in the County of Cornwall. As 
Sir Hugh Foot he had 
previously served as per- 
manent United Kingdom 
representative and the U. N. 
Trusteeship Council with the 
personal rank of Ambassador. 
He had also represented the U. 
i. on the Fourth Committee of 
he General Assembly and 



Affairs 

Former British Minister 



acted as principal adviser in 
the British Mission to the U.N. 
on matters concerning 
relations with newly in- 
dependent nations. In 1963 he 
was appointed Consultant to 
the U. N. Special Fund with 
responsibility for dealing with 
governments of new countries, 
particularly in Africa, about 
economic development. He 
comes of a notable West 
Country family. He is the 
second son of the late Rt. Hon. 
Isaac Foot, a former Liberal 
M. P. and a Minister in the 
Government in the early 1930s. 
Two of his brothers, Sir Dingle 
Foot and Mr. Michael Foot, 
have been members of 
Parliament, the former having 
served as Solicitor-General 
from 1964 to 1967. Another 
brother, John, was made a Life 
Peer in November, 1967. 

Hugh Mackintosh Foot was 
born in Plymouth on October 8, 



1907 and educated at the 
Quaker School at Reading, 
Leighton Park School and at 
St. John's College, Cambridge 
where he was President of the 
Union and a member of its 
debating team which visited 
American universities. 




On leaving Cambridge, Lord 
Caradon entered the Colonial 
Service and was posted to 
Palestine as an Administrative 
Officer. In 1943 he went to 
Cyprus as Colonial Secretary 
and then Governor. He served 
two years as Coloniam 
Secretary in Jamaica and four 
years as Chief Secretary in 
Nigeria, in both countries 
acting as Governor. From 1951 
to 1957 he was Governor-in- 
Chief in Jamaica and guided 
the constitutional develop- 
ments leading up to internal 
self-government. In Nigeria as 
Chief Secretary he played a 
major part in the preparation 
of the first Federal con- 
stitution. 

Lord Caradon was made an 
honorary Fellow of St. John's 
College, Cambridge in 1950 and 
an honorary Doctor of Laws of 
Princeton University in 1965. 



"Freedom — When?" 



"It is an honor to be born me!", so 
said Mr. James Farmer, former undersec- 
retary for H.E.W., as he spoke in the 
little theatre Wednesday night. He added 
that if all people especially Blacks, took 
this type of attitude, many of the coun- 
try's problems could be solved. 

He went on to emphasize that this na- 
tion has never been the "melting pot" 
envisioned by our forefathers. There has 
always been segregation, whether it be 
by race, color or religion, in this country. 
This segregation has become one of the 
major factors which have caused changes 
in the system. Historically, many of 
these changes have had to be obtained in 
violent manners. 

Mr. Farmer labeled his theory of inte- 
gration, "cultural pluralism." He believes 
that we should be fully integrated cultur- 
ally, specifically in respects to our race 
problem. If this integration occurs, then 
we will have halted much of the friction 
that has led to violent and unorthodox 
action. 

He would like to see a Vietnam with- 
drawal this summer. 



He said that Blacks should vote as a 
power bloc so that they can best make 
use of the politics of a campaign. Blacks 
should not pledge their allegiance to any 
one party. Instead, they should be voting 
for the candidates that will best serve 
their interests. He recommended ticket 
splitting to accomplish this goal. 

Life has greatly improved for the 
Blacks in this country over the past dec- 
ade. Unfortunately, this improvement 
has not kept pace with other improve- 
ments in the economic scene. He noted 
that, in effect, the majority of this coun- 
try's Black citizens are in worse shape 
now than they were ten years ago. 

At the press conference previous to his 
lecture, Mr. Farmer answered questions 
from reporters. The following are some 
excerpts from this press conference. 

The Nixon administration must create 
more jobs, especially with summer vaca- 
tions rapidly approaching. 

The Calley decision and its aftermath 
have strains of racism. A Black man in 
the same situation would not have 
evoked such sentiment from the Ameri- 



can public nor such presidential action. 
He added that President Nixon should 
not have intervened in this matter. Cal- 
ley did violate the Geneva Agreement. 

The proposed Black presidential can- 
didate would assure victory for Nixon. 

On Spiro, "He's a better golf player 
than I thought he was." He deserves to 
be muzzled. This one man has caused 
more polarization in this country than 
any other force. Most of what he says, 
he is saying for the president. 

Leaving H.E.VV. was a personal choice. 
He feels that he is more effective outside 
of the government. 

Freedom will be reached when all pre- 
judices are removed. 

Old line politics no longer work. 
Southern strategy is dead. 

The 18-21 year old, newly enfran- 
chised, voters will be an important force, 
at the polls, in the '72 election. 

Any person interested in listening to 
the lecture can do so by contacting the 
library or WVAC where it is now on file 
along with the speeches of other recent 
guest speakers. 




Below 1st Row: Bill Cordes, Dan Jayson, Joe Cacciatore, Gary Bonacci, Ray Celentano; 2nd Row: 
Gordon Goldstein, Jim DeFillipo, Kieth Kincannon, Bob Hyde, Jim Dalzell, Jim Sulesky, Jim Navoni, 
Dave Rosow, Bob Connelly, Coach Donavan, Max Factor 









Opponents 




Curry 


57 


Bridgewater State 


85 


Curry 


67 


Roger Williams 


114 


Curry 


50 


New England College 


55 


Curry 


65 


Franklin Pierce 


78 


Curry 


48 


Fitchburg State 


53 


Curry 


77 


Belknap College 


63 


Curry 


57 


Suffolk University 


66 


Curry 


59 


Framingham State 


50 


Curry 


52 


Bridgewater State 


50 


Curry 


61 


Windham College 


52 


Curry 


71 


S.M.U. 


80 


Curry 


71 


Hellenic College 


60 


Curry 


69 


Nathaniel Hawthorne 


64 


Curry 


38 


Roger Williams 


68 


Curry 


93 


Framingham State 


96 


Curry 


64 


S.M.U. 


76 


Curry 


58 


Eastern New England 


66 


Curry 


90 


Belknap 


78 


Curry 


75 


New England College 


64 


Curry 


75 


Franklin Pierce 


88 


Curry 


59 


Nathaniel Hawthorne 


85 



The Colonels had a disappointing year with a 8-13 
record but playing their first five games away from home 
put them off on a bad foot. They averaged only 59 pts 
per game whereas their opponents had 68 pts per game. 
They are a young team and we hope for better things in 
the future. 




73-hour game nets 9600 pts. at Curry 



By Jack Barry 
Globe Staff 
March - 1970 

MILTON — Curry College's var- 
sity basketball team may not have 
set the world afire this season, but 
the school's intramural quintets 
jumped into what may be interna- 
tional prominence after completing 
73 consecutive hours of basketball 
play, starting at noon last Friday. 

At 1 p.m. yesterday, a pair of 
12-man squads saw the final hoop 
flop through the strings to set up 
a score of 4796 points for Theta 
Epsilon Chi fraternity against Alpha 
Gamma Beta's 4783. There were no 
physical casualties other than weari- 



ness. 

The 73-hour marathon surpassed 
by 60 minutes the endurance bas- 
ketball contest between two fra- 
ternities at Elizabeth, England, in 
1968, which was the major point of 
the extended recording. The two- 
team total point scoring record of 
Elizabeth, Eng., of 3181 against 
3056 went by the boards. 

Behind it all, however, was a 
most charitable gesture, the raising 
of $311 from admission fees of 25 
cents for Curry College students, 
for the Martin Luther King Jr. 
Scholarship Fund benefit. 

The contest and charity theme 
was the brainchild of AGB's Mike 



Gagliardi, one of the 12 iron men, 
with assists for cooperation in pro- 
motion going to referee Larry Cos- 
tello who went the entire distance, 
with and without a whistle. 

Also aiding were Patricia "Patty" 
Chane, statistician; trainers Bill 
Green, Jeff Korn and Don Mac- 
Meekin, and Tom Dippert, WBVC, 
the school's radio station. 

Leading scorers were Dave De- 
Rocchi with 784; Dennis Flavin, 
656, a great rebounder for the win- 
ners; John Lawton, 684, and Gene 
Sorel, 656. 

One team upon an occasion led 
by as much as 250 points. 



Handball - 

There is a new intramural 
sport at Curry. The new 
sport is handball. This is 
the first time the sport has 
been offered at Curry, so 
you could call it an experi- 
ment. 

The originator of the sport, 
Coach 'Riordan wants to give 
Curry students a variety in 
the sports in which they can 
participate. One problem is 
that handball is relatively 
unknown, and the students 
either don't know what the 
game is all about or they are 
afraid to learn more about it. 

The tournament was held 
on February 16 and 17, in 
the gym. There was a single 
elimination tournament, 

meaning if you lose once you 
are out. Paul Wujack de- 
feated Barney Nugent 20-17 
for the singles champion- 
ship. The double winners 
were Al Reid and Lloyd 
Mapp, who defeated Nat 
Reidel and Mitch Hackett, 
by a score of 20-4. 



"The Year of 

the Quarterback" 

According to all of the PR men, 1970 was the "Year of the 
Quarterback." Yet after the first three selections in the Pro Foot- 
ball Draft, another Quarterback was not selected until the third 
round. The three Quarterbacks selected in the first round all 
have excellent credentials. Jim Plunkett, Archie Manning, and 
Dan Pastorini all were rated by the professional scouts as Quar- 
terbacks who will be able to step in and command a professional 
Football Offense. Other Quarterbacks lacked in most cases the 
knowledge, the size, or were not pocket passers. 

People are not rushing to the Boston Patriots ticket office to 
buy season tickets (ED. NOTE: Quoted from the Boston Globe 
Feb. 2, 1971; "Season ticket Sales Pass 31,000 Mark.") These fans 
are sure that the drafting of Jim Plunkett will put the Patriots 
into the Super Bowl. Not even Joe Namath brought the Jets into 
a World's Championship himself. A football team must have a 
top notch organization both on and off the field. Players must be 
willing to play for the team and not themselves. Ron Sellers, Jim 
Nance, and Carl Garrett must be traded to make way for players, 
good players, who will be concerned with the final score not in- 
dividual statistics. 

The Patriots this year must take on the Jets, Dolphins and Colts 
twice and the Forty-Niners, Cowboys, and Browns once. If the 
Patriots hope to better their 2-12 record of this year, changes 
must be made immediately or next January the Patriots will 
again be talking about making changes. 



Track Club Seeks Members 



On April 3 in Washington D.C. the 
new Curry College Track Club partici- 
pated in a meet against 33 of the top teams 
in the country. Among the colleges partici- 
pating were Navy, Morgan State, and the 
Baltimore Olympic club. Steve Viola, Ted 
Kelly, Keith Kincannon and Reggie Green 
were the only men from Curry that par- 
ticipated in the meet. 

Since the club's return from Washing- 



ton, there has been a great deal of inter- 
est from Curry students about the club. If 
you have had some previous experience in 
track and would like to join this club, 
please contact Steve Viola, (box 463) by 
Monday April 12. 

The next scheduled meet is set for Sat- 
urday April 24, against Brandeis Univer- 
sity. Other meets will be scheduled de- 
pending on the participants. 



Basketball - 

Intramural basketball has 
ended the season quite sue 
cessfully. The championship 
game was the finishing touch. 

The championship is played 
between the champion of 
division I and division II. 
This year's game was very 
exciting, and was a tremen- 
dous finish to a highly suc- 
cessful season. 

So as to understand how 
the teams reach the playoffs, 
a brief recap of the season 
is necessary. In each divi- 
sion the first three teams 
were awarded playoff berth. 
In division I, OEX, (I) the 
Globetrotters, and the alpha- 
Rays, made the playoffs. In 
division II the three teams 
were the Busters, the only 
undefeated team, the Studs, 
and the Jaspers. 

OEX I and the Busters were 
given first raps in the semies 
the former coming out on 
top. The Alpha-Rays were 
victorious over the Globe- 
trotters who were forced to 
forfeit. The Alpha-Rays then 
beat OEX I 49-38 for the 
division I championship. 

In division II the Studs 
pulled ahead of the Jaspers, 
but were defeated by the 
Busters 56-31. 

In the championship game, 
the Alpha-Rays defeated the 
Busters 39-32. Coach Rio- 
dan praised both teams for 
a good, clean, and exciting 
game. Riordan gave special 
praise to the game played 
by Bob Brash and Jim Mc- 
Caffrey, both of the Alpha- 
Rays. 




John S. Hafer — President of the College, John O. Gawne - Dean of Personnel Services, Milton L. 
Boyle, Jr. — Assistant to the President. 



.'/**> 




Left; Warren S. Bazirgan — Director of Public Relations, Right; Donald S. McNeil — Director of 
Development 




Helen G. LeBaron, Bursar 



Marjorie W. MacLeod, Director of the Library 





Thomas D. Goldrick, Business Manager 



John P. Vallely, Director of Purchasing 



58 






Cecil H. Rose, Chaplain of the College, Director of 
Financial Aid 



Hiram J. Evans, Dean of the College 




Richard Mantz, Dean of Admissions 



Mark Warter, Admissions Counselor 



59 



Ecology Fair 




Who's Who 

15 Students Named 




SID BEARD, Clarence, N.Y. Government Major; Alpha 
Gamma Beta Fraternity; Colonel Staff; Student Senate; 
Vice President, Junior Class; Counselor; Dean's List. 




HELENE FLOM, 
Springfield, 
Massachusetts 
Elementary 
Education Major; 
Counselor; Dean's List. 




CATHY BLAU, Westbury, New York Elementary Education 
major; Curryer Staff; Colonel Staff; Counselor. 




JOE VENTRONE, Cranston, Rhode Island Government Major; Student Senate; 
Curryer Staff; Alpha Gamma Beta Fraternity; Interfaith Council; Thetas; Counselor; 
Dean's List. 




JOYCE MARGOL1S, Rochester, New 
York Sociology Major; Student Senate; 
Dean's List; Homecoming Queen — 1969; 
Co-chairmen Parents Weekend. 




RENEE RENDA, Lynnfield, Massachusetts Elementary Education 
Major; Counselor; Madrigal; Choir; Dean's List; Alexander Graham 
Bell Society. 






DON MITCHELL, Brookfield, Connecticut 
Government Major; Alpha Gamma Beta 
Fraternity; Curryer Staff; Student Senate; 
Co-chairman Parents Weekend; President of 
Senior Class. 



GENE SCHAFFER, New Providence, New Jersey 
History Major; Counselor; Basketball team; Varsity 
Club; Dean's List. 




Distinguished Students Named 







ROBERT CARAPELLA, Penfield, New York History Major; Curryer 
Editor — 1970; Photography Editor — Colonel; Photography Club Vice 
President; Interfaith Council; Newman Club; MDC 



NINA HARDING, Meriden, Connecticut Elementary Education Major; 
Counselor; Editor - CoEd; Interfaith Council; Curryer Staff; Choir; Dean's List. 



SHEROLYN MAHONEY, Rochester, New York Elementary 
Education Major; Counselor; Interfaith Council; Dean's List. 





^"*>»»*., 



JEFF GRANT, West Hartford, Connecticut Business Administration 
Major; Curryer; Photography Club; Interfaith; MDC; Dean's List. 



USAN MARTIN, Pompton Lakes, New Jersey Elementary Education Major; 
ounselor; Ski Club; Dean's List. 




HELEN ARCHER, Albany, New York English Major; 
Student Senate; Homecoming Queen — 1970; 
Dean's List. 







ROBERT BRAY, Montague Center, Massachusetts Psy- 
chology Major; Counselor; Psychology Club; Dean's List. 






xNA v\\r,iuui;ii7/ /7// . 

a 3 

ALL-AMERICAN CRITICAL SERVICE 

THE COLONEL 



<£urrn 





Lenny Gutkin, Ken Bragg, Norman Shink, Marc Harris, Richard Steiner, Bill Cooper, Regina Sokol, Sam Gelb. 

66 



CURRY COLLEGE 



TheColonel 






THE COLONEL 

A Curry College Student Publication 



editor: Marc A. Harris 
managing editor: Richard Steiner 

«RE6S 

associate editor: Tim Garvey sports editor: Sam Gelb 

business manager: Bob Mavageri photo editor: Bob Carapella 

mercenary editor: Steve Oe Angelis 

staff: Steve Striar, Judy Adams, Regina Sokol, Bill Cooper, Pro- 
fessor David L. Fama, Howie Harris and Steve Samuels. 

THE COLONEL must insist that all unsolicited material be signed. 
Names will be withheld by request. 

THE COLONEL is located in room 310 of the North Academic 
Center of Curry College, 848 Brush Hill Road, Milton, Mass. 02186. 
Phone 333-0500, ext. 360. 



REPRESENTED FOP 



¥ 



National Educational Advertising Services 

A DIVISION OF 

READER'! DIGEST SALES Si SERVICES, INC. 
360 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y. 1QQ17 



I 




THE COLONEL 

APRIL 8, 1971 Number 10 



editor-in-chief: Marc A. Harris 



y We6l i — managing editor: Richard Steiner 

business manager and sports editor: Sam Gelb 




advertising mgr.: Lenny Gutkin 
the mercenary: Steve De Angelis 
photo editor: Bob Carapella 



feature editor: Norman Shink 
music critic: Ken Bragg 
advisor: Joseph Schneider 
staff: Jo-Jo Hensen, Steve Samuels, Steve Striar, Howard Harris, 
John Gillespie, Regina Sokol, Judv Adams, Cathy Blau, 
Prof. David L. Fama, Jeffrey Grant, Bill Cooper, Charles 
Ross, Mike MogeL 

THE COLONEL ie published six times a semester by the students of Curry 
College. Address editorial communications to the Editor and business and 
subscription communications to the Business Manager at THE COLONEL. 
Curry College. Milton, Massachusetts. 02186. Represented for national adver- 
tising by. the National Educational Advertising Service, Inc., N.T., N.T. 
Bequests for reproduction or use of any material herein must be obtained 
from the Editor in writing. Phone 333-0600 ext. 380 for information. 
THE COLONEL assumes no responsibility for printing errors. In the event 
that an error occurs in advertising we will reprint that part of the adver- 
tisement in which the error occurs. 

The College exercises no control over the content of the student writings 
contained herein. Opinions expressed In all signed articles are strictly the 
opinions of the writer and In no way should they be considered the opinions 
of this publication or of the students of Curry College. Editorial comment* 
do not represent official college policy or opinion. 

The editors of THE COLONEL realize their responsibility to the college 
community to present opposing views from responsible spokesmen. 
THE COLONEL must insist that all unsolicited material be signed. Names 
may be withheld by request. All unsigned material wUl be destroyed. 



EAOTS OT t.t _J-/ii 




Curryer Staff 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Tim Garvey, AD- 
VISING EDITOR Bob Carapella, AS- 
SOCIATE EDITOR Bob Meers, BUSI- 
NESS MANAGER Randy Cotton, 
LAYOUT EDITOR Steve Bleecker, 
ACTIVITIES EDITOR Nina Harding, 
ART EDITOR Sandy Klibe, SPORTS 
EDITOR Jeff Grant, BUSINESS EDITOR 
Steve Brown. STAFF Corrine Possel, 
Mary Ann Korzniok, Judy Robinson, 
Cathy Blau (Garter Bowl), Dick White, 
Don Mitchell, Joe Ventrone, Mike Fields, 
Barb Matthews, Rick Krinov, Nick 
Bramati. LITERARY Joyce Margolis, 
Helen Archer, Chris DeFelice. PHOTOG- 
RAPHERS Steve Striar, Howie Harris, Rick 
Davis, Bob Carapella, Jeff Grant, Dodge- 
Murphy. 




Front; Mike Fields, Judy Robinson, Mary Ann Korzniok, Bob Carapella, Jeff Grant. Back; Steve Striar, 
Dick White, Tim Garvey, Bob Meers, Joe Ventrone, Howie Harris. 




Joe Ventrone 




Nina Harding 




JIM 

Jeff Grant 




Bob Carapella 




Tim Garvey, Sandy Klibe 



Randy Cotton 




Steve Bleecker 




Randy Cotton 



Tim Garvey 
70 



Spring Fashion Show 






THE STUDENT SENATE PRESENTS 




WEEKEND 
71 

Feb. 19 
and 20 



Ticket Info: 

Student Senate 

Office 

or call 

333-0315 

333-0500 

Ext. 361 




IN CONCERT 

Friday the 19th, 8 P.M. 

South Campus Auditorium 

Also 
'JONATHAN EDWARDS" 
Admission $3 per person 
Saturday 
the 20th f 8 P.M. 

PARK STREET UNDER" 
and 

"ORPHANS" 

Location 

Chateau de Ville 
(Rte. 9, Framingham) 

Hot & cold hors d'ouevres will be served." 

$8.00 Per Couple 
Both Nights $^12.00 Per Couple 




Staff, from bottom: Bill Green (asst. news dir.), Tom Dippert (music dir.), Steve 
Phillips (sports dir.), Steve Lohle (news dir.), Jerry Kahn, Abby Agranovitch, John 
Sherman (engineer), Sam Gelb, Holden Hills (asst. music dir.), Dan Braude, Bob 
Silverman, Ken Bragg (man'gr.), Joe DeSua, Steve Bleecker (program dir.), Rich 
Grilli, Al Marshall. 










LOGOS 



an experiment in multi-media communications 

Every Monday at 9 P.M. on 
WVAC 64 



In the beginning, it was just 
an idea, but in 1968, it became a 
reality . . . WVAC . . . Curry's 
own voice. Now, after three 
years of hard work, the radio 
station can be respected as a 
center of communication for the 
Curry student, a continuous, 
daily operation of service to the 
college community, and most 
important, a blossoming center 
of practical experience for the 
broadcast-minded student. The 
staff looks forward, with great 
expectation, to the 1971-1972 
broadcast year. 

Steve Bleecker 




79 




Seated; Bob Stanton, Bob Mitchell, Bill Hovey, Bob Monk (President), Mike Neuhart, Ken Camerota, 
Bruce Tindal. Standing; Dave DeRocchi, John Watson, John White, Dick Wallace, Neil Reed, Rick 
Dalessio, Greg Bazilus, Steve Kavovit. Missing; Jeff Crowther, Norm Cunningham, Jim Montemurro, 
Joe Nappe. 




Seated; Joe Ventrone, Dave Garafano, Willard Horn, Holden Hills, Ross Kirk, Bruce Harmon, Don 
Mitchell, George Reid. Standing; Dean Morgenstern, Tom Dippert, Ralph Sevinor, Rich Hebard, Bob 
Bolen, Steve Petigrow, Doc Condit (advisor), Kim Verruter, John Lawton, Jeff Korn, Dave Boileau, Jim 
McCaffrey, Pierre Brulte, Jay Knick, Bruce Flaig, Joe Girardi. Missing; Sidney Beard, Bob Brash, Don 
Cohen, Randy Cotton (President), Michael DiMotta, Chip Kaufman, Don MacMeekin, Mark Murphy. 



80 




c 

L 
A 
S 
S 



Class of '73: Vice president Steve Bleecker, President Tom Butler, Secretary Maureen Scully, Treasurer 
Bob Stanton. 




Class of 72: Left - Treasurer Jeff Rudolph, Right - 
President Ross Kirk. Missing — Vice President 
Howie Pearlman, Secretary Karen Anderson. 



o 

F 
F 
I 

C 
E 
R 
S 



Class of '74: Vice President Jordan Lewis, President Barry Snieder, Secretary Phyllis Kamp, Treasurer 
James Wahl. 




Men's Dormitory Council 



Executives; Advisor Dick White, Vice President Mark Chase, Preside nt Steve Landrigan, Treasurer Bill Mellin. (below) seated: Bill Green, 
Mark Chase, Dick White, Norm Shink, Joe Ventrone, (2nd row) Don Mitchell, Bob Weber, Ron Chapin, Kevin Smith, Sam Gelb, Jeff 
Grant, Marc Harris, Bob Carapella, Ken Schofield, (last row), Ross Kirk, Wells Peck, Steve Landrigan, Timothy Garvey, Bill Mellin. 




1 




W.S.G.A. Officers seated: Treasurer Lilly Messer, Vice President Sandy Klibe, Dean Kakascik, 
President (of Statehouse) Christine Cain, Vice President Barbara Bork, Standing: Secretary Laurie 
Fagelbaum, Vice President Pat Kinney, President (of Mayflower) Maureen Scully, Secretary Joyce 
Palantoni, President (of Milton) Virginia Miller. 



Housemothers seated: Barbara Pettingill, Hazel Hansen, Leila McLaughlin, Assistant Mary Zavatone. 
Missing from picture, Ruth Loney. 





Left to right: Al Reid, Bill Green, 
Joe Ventrone, Bob Bray, Jim 
Schlansker, Marc Harris, Don 
Mitchell, Tim Garvey, Ross ICirk, 
Ron Chapin, Mike Fields. Missing: 
Bob Antinerella, John Donnelly, 
Richard White, John Guiney, Rich 
Setiner, Chris Callahan, Al Unangst, 
Gene Schaefer, Tony Regitano. 



c 
o 
u 

N 

s 

E 
L 
O 
R 
5 




Sitting; Pat Friery, Cathy Blau, Sue Martin, Nina Harding, Mary Ann Korznick, Standing; Sherolyn 
Mahoney, Jane Chosiad, Marti Abeles, Margie Ward, Dean Kakascik, Sheri Rose, Diane Larrier, Debbie 
Thompson, Connie Petrucelli. 



84 




CURRY COLLEGE CONCERT CHOIR 

Edward H. Hastings, Director 

Claude Noel and Frank Niezgorski, Accompanists 



Judith Adams 
Beth Berkowitz 
Jane Chosiad 
Jean Ermatinger 



Patricia Brett 
Freda Fialkow 
Nina Harding 
Anne Hewson 



Robert Cofrman 
Kevin Connor 
David Fallon 



Greg Bazilus 
Donald Cohen 
Timothy Conway 
William Cooper 
Vincent Cosentino 



SOPRANO 

Deborah Hooper 
M. Ann Korzniok 
Diane Larrier 
Carol MacDonald 

ALTO 
Martha Hunt 
Nancy Kaye 
Sandra Klein 
Barbara Matthews 

TENOR 

William Howell 
Barry Karlin 
Stephan Lundvall 

BASS 

Michael Donovan 
William Doolittle 
Michael Faulkner 
Timothy Garvey 
Kevin Holley 
Robert Hyde 



Barbara Nenninger 
Judith Robinson 
Christine Sousa 



Lillian Orchard 
Janice Paul 
Regina Sokol 
Margaret Ward 



Frank Niezgorski 
Steven Tuck 



Brian Jobson 
James Lumley 
Michael Neuhart 
Henry Quagenti 
Timothy Taylor 



CURRY COLLEGE MADRIGAL SINGERS 



Judith Adams 
Kevin Connor 
William Doolittle 
Timothy Garvey 
Martha Hunt 



Kenton F. Steward, Director 
Paul Thistle, Accompanist 

Michele Kelley 
Diane Larrier 
Carol McDonald 
Barbara Matthews 
Robert Maxwell 



Barbara Nenninger 
Judith Robinson 
Brian Tatro 
Timothy Taylor 



FLUTES 



CURRY COLLEGE WIND ENSEMBLE 

Kenton F. Steward, Director 

Edward J. Spillane,' Asst. Director 

SAXOPHONE 



Timothy Conway 
Martha Hunt 

CLARINETS 

Judith Adams 
Kenneth Kostechka 
Thomas Lyons 
William Mellin 
Suzanne Setzer 

BASS CLARINET 

Alan Milkof* 






Kenneth Kostechka 
TRUMPETS 

William Doolittle* 
Michael Field* 
Owen Flanagan 

TROMBONES 

Craig Burton* 
John Sloate 
v Member of Brass Quartet 



If r J 

r ■ ■/ ■ l . 



FRENCH HORN 

Stephen Berg 

TUBA 

Jerrold Fleishman 

PERCUSSION 

Kevin McDonough 
Betsy Robinovitz (bells) 
Timothy Taylor (tympani) 
Bruce Werme 

BARITONE HORN 
Kevin Connor* 







e f» r 




r^- -< 



■HH 




:m-A.w a 










f 





'*# E f? 



& 




Front to Back: Lillian Orchard, Carol Weingrow, Lea Cohen, Connie Petrucellie, Sue Joel, Debbie 
Perelli, Carol MacDonald, Michele Kelly. 





INTERFAITH COUNCIL (seated); Bob Carapella, Nina Harding (Chairman), Mike Stone, (standing), 
Jenny Morton, Judy Robbins, Tina Goldstein, Sherolyn Mahoney, Pamela DeGroot. 



**- ; i 




// « 



SKI CLUB: President Brian Jobson, Vice President Robert Judge, Secretary Susan Martin, Treasurer 
Carol Glencross. 



SPANNING THE ICE . . . 



1st Row: Blake Killin, Ed Sabol, Dan Doyle, Bob Maxwell, Rod Hendrigan, Randy Hauserman, 2nd 
Row: Coach Gary Hintlian, Stu Kepnes, Ralph Sevinor, Rudy Bickle, Mike Neuhart, Louis Dexter, Bill 
Doolittle. Missing: W. Brock Foster, John Guiney, Manager Bruce Ohanian. 




THE HOCKEY CLUB 



Co-Captains Robert Maxwell and Danny Doyle 




"Barefoot In The Park" 





> 



M 



t 








Curry 

Curry 

Curry 

Curry 

Curry 

Curry 

Curry 

Curry 

Curry 

Curry 

Curry 

Curry 

Curry 

Curry 

Curry 

Curry wins two on 

Roger Williams 

Curry 6-8 



12-0 
7-10 

10-5 

15-2 
5-4 
7-2 
4-8 
6-2 
6-1 
4-5 
5-2 

15-4 
9-1 
2-0 
6-5 



Emerson 
S.M.U. 

Nathaniel Hawthorne 

Belknap 

Nasson 

Nasson 

Suffolk 

Husson 

Emerson 

N.Y.T.I. 

N.Y.T.I. 

Emerson 

Nasson 

Nasson 

Stonehill 

doubleheader forfeits by 

S.M.U. 



, > fi 1 A 





PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 
Steve Striar 
Marc Harris 
Howie Harris 
Bob Carapella 



W 




PSYCHOLOGY CLUB (seated) Sherolyn Mahoney, Regina Sokol, Phyllis Kamp, Steve Landrigan 
(President), Tina Goldstein (Vice President), Lillian Orchard (secretary), standing; Mike Stone, Bob 
Mavageri, Howie Harris (Treasurer), Jeff Rudolph, Joe Ventrone, Don Mitchell. 




THETAS 
Doc Condit 
Mrs. McCann 
Beth Berkowitz 
Sandy Rosen 
Tom Martin 
Peter Ewald 
Phil Detsch 
Steve Lundvall 
Dave Kimball 
Bruce Schiavi 
Norm Shink 
Conrad Gonthier 



Debate Team Places 5th In 
International Tourney 

Curry College's fledgling debate team placed fifth in the overall team standings at 
the International Debate Tournament, sponsored by McGill University in Mon- 
treal, Canada. 

Seventy-eight teams from 39 colleges from throughout the United States and 
Canada participated in the competition. Among the colleges represented were 
Princeton, Wesleyan, Amherst, Emerson, Northeastern, the University of New 
Hampshire, the University of Buffalo, and the University of Toronto. 

The prepared topic for the Tournament was "Resolve That Heretics are The 
Only Bitter Remedy Against the Entrophy of Human Thought." 

Curry's debating program began last year, but this is the first year the College 
has formally fielded a debating team. Coached by Prof. Haig DerMarderosian, the 
Curry team in Montreal consisted of Conrad Gonthier, David Kimball, Thomas 
Martin, and Robert Uvello. Gary Zucker, also a student at Curry, served as one of 
the judges in the McGill Tournament. 

On March 12, the Curry team will compete against the Norfolk Prison team, 
and in April, it will participate in the Annual New England Forensic Conference at 
the University of Maine. Last year, Curry debaters tied for first place with Emer- 
son in the "extra events" phase of this Conference. It was the first time the Col- 
lege had ever entered debating competition. 



Depth and consistency was to be the key 
to the 1971 varsity tennis success. Under 
the watchful eye of Coach Riordan, the 
team smashed their way to a 10-0 mark, an 
achievement not matched since 1967. 
Throughout the season, no more than 3 
points were given up to an opponent. Ken 
Camerata and Neil Pollack were undefeated 
in singles play, while Bill Doolittle and Neil 
Pollack posted a perfect record in doubles. 



Curry 


7-2 


Nasson 


Curry 


6-3 


Bridgewater 


Curry 


9-0 


Eastern Nazarene 


Curry 


9-0 


Franklin Pierce 


Curry 


9-0 


Eastern Nazarene 


Curry 


8-1 


New York Tech. 


Curry 


7-2 


Bridgewater 


Curry 


9-0 


Suffolk 


Curry 


6-3 


Stonehill 


Curry 


8-1 


Barrington 




Kevin Maxwell, John Lawton, Richard Hebard, Coach Riordan, Bill Doolittle, Neil Pollack, Ken 
Camerata. (missing) Jeff Semar. 






WgM 




GOLF TEAM 
Coach Donovan 
Iggy Giangregorio 
Bob Maxwell 
Fred Kotowitz 
ohn Guiney 
Mac Bruce 
Joe O'Brien 
(missing) 
Bob Schuman 
Bruce Ohanian 




Putterers Record Is 1-5 




Honors Convocation 

Alexander Graham Bell 
Honor Society 



John P. Brunelli 
John J. Day 
William A. Henderson 
Bettina A. Krainin 
Lillian F. Orchard 
Patricia A. Soares 
Robert J. Uvello 
Deborah D. Sexton 





t±r; ■-£&&&>**$ 



£ » 



T ** W (t 




MAY 18, 1971 



THE COLONEL 



Hafer, Ventrone, Harding and 
Mahoney Cop Major Awards 

President John S. Hafer, Joseph Ventrone, Nina Harding and Sherolyn 
Mahoney received the most prestigious honors at the Annual Awards 
Night Dinner last Wednesday night. 



Awards presentations began 
after an excellent Hayes-Bickford 
catered dinner. 

Awards were given to men and 
women counselors and House 
Directors by Dean Capalbo and 
Dean Kakasic. 

Officials of the M.D.C. and the 
W.S.G.A. presented awards to floor 
reps and judiciary board members 
and those people who were 
prominent in this year's activities. 

The Student Senate made 
several presentations, among 



these the "Rubber Chicken 
Award" awarded to the college 
food service. Vern Blodgett 
humbly accepted. 

The Housemothers were 
presented with small tokens of 
esteem for their many years of 
service. The W.S.G.A. and the 
M.D.C. also recognized their 
achievements. 

Joseph Ventrone, Master of 
Ceremonies for the night, was the 
recipient of the "Outstanding Male 
Resident Student" award for 1971. 
Richard White, last year's winner, 
presented the award to Joe. 



Dr. Gawne presented the 
"Outstanding Woman Resident 
Student" award to both Nina 
Harding and Sherolyn Mahoney. 
The selection committee was 
unable to decide between these two 
women, so they were both 
recognized with the award. 

The "Man of the Year" award, 
presented jointly by the M.D.C. 
and the W.S.G.A., was presented to 
President John S. Hafer. Dean 
Rose accepted the award for 
President Hafer, who was absent 
on important college business. 




E 

N 

I 

O 

R 

C 

L 
A 
S 
S 




Donald D. Mitchell 

Government 

President 



Patricia A. Chave 

Psychology 

Vice President 



Christine DeFelice 

History 

Treasurer 




Sandra L. Klibe 

Speech 

Secretary 




o 

F 
F 
I 

C 
E 
R 
S 

1 
9 

7 
1 



Frank C. Agnes 
Business Administration 




William C Anderson, Jr. 
History 



Mark K. Arakelian 
English 




"I have felt lonely, forgot- 
ten or even left out, set 
apart from the rest of the 
world. I never wanted out. 
If anything I wanted in" 



William Arbuckle 
English 



Helen M. Archer 
English 





Thomas F. Bannister 
Business Administration 



Joseph R. Barbera 
Biology 





Gregory L Bazilus 
History 



Sidney E. Beard 
Government 





Sally J. Belcher 
Sociology 



Elaine M. Bistany 
Elementary Education 





Catherine A. Blau 
Elementary Education 



Alan R. Blount 
Business Administration 





Robert Bolen 
History 



Nicholas P. Boniface 
Business Administration 



By walking I found out where I was going 

By intensely hating, how to love 

By loving, where and what to love 

By grieving, how to laugh 

Out of infirmity, I have built strength 

Out of untruth, truth 

From hypocrisy, I have weaved directness 

Almost now, I know who I am 

Almost I have the boldness to be that man. 



Geoffrey E. Borr 
Philosophy 



Wayne Bovi 
English 





Kenneth C Bragg 
Communicative 
Arts and Sciences 



Robert D. Brash 
Psychology 





Robert J. Bray 
Psychology 



Pierre J. Brulte III 
History 





John P. Brunelli 
History 



Ruth O. Cabbe 
Mathematics 




Robert L. Carapella 
History 





- Physics, Indar Raj Kamal — Physics, John Tramondozzi — Chemistry: 
Mathematics, Rudolph Goetz — Chemistry, Richard Kosh — Biology. 



^j^mm-Ws 



' ■ ' : : 









J8»»„i.H»^ 




Seated; John Gawne - Psychology, Albert Sherring - Sociology, Allan Greenberg - History, Patricia Fleming - Anthropology, Pamela Wrinch — History & 
Government; Standing; Robert Keighton — Government, Carl Cooper — Psychology, John Hill — Government, Leon Rudman — Economics, Robert Carden — 
History, Robert Capalbo — History, William Roth — History. 




Paul J. Chin 

Business Administration 





Jane S. Chosiad 
English 



David M. Conlin 
Business Administration 





Janet R. Connolly 
Elementary Education 



Kevin M. Connor 
Government 





Carol E. Creighton 
Elementary Education 



William A. Davison, Jr 
Psychology 





John J. Day 
History 



Stephen R. De Angelis 
Psychology 





Anna M. De Camp 
Elementary Education 



Pamela De Groot 
Elementary Education 





Edith J. Dehm 
Elementary Education 



Brian S. Donnell 
English 






Michael T. Donovan 
English 



John H. Dooley 
Business Administration 




Christine M. Duffy 
Elementary Education 



Lydia T. Elliot 
Elementary Education 



Nothing 


ventured 


nothing 


gained S 


o be not 


afraid 


to try — 


So dream big 


dreams And reach for 


the stars 


And set 


your 


standards high. 






Alan G. Factor 
History 





David J. Fallon 
English 





%.;■ 




&m 




Michael J. Field 
Business Administration 




\ 




11 JlP^ 




Jerrold Fleishman 
Biology 



Helene Flom 
Elementary Education 





Sandra L Gesuelle 
Psychology 



Edward H. Granger HI 
Business Administration 



Alix Jo Greenblat 
Elementary Education 



John P. Hail H 
History 



"Time 

present 

and 

time 

past 

are 

both 

perhaps 

present 

in 

time 

future, 

and 

time 

future 

continued 

in time 

past. 

If 

all 

time 

is eternally present 

all time 

is unredeemable." 




Jeffrey F. Grant 
Business Administration 




Richard J. Grilli 
History 



< V 




Mark C. Hannington 
Business Administration 



Nina E. Harding 
Elementary Education 





Marc A. Harris 
Economics 



James T. Hart 
Business Administration 




"All the world 
is but a stage 
on which every 
man must play 
his part." 



William E. Hettich 
Business Administration 



Joseph Hoffman 
Business Administration 





Stephen P. Holton 
Economics 



Williard N. Horn 
Psychology 





Robert B. Hyde Jr 
Mathematics 



Calvin W. Jenkins 
English 




Cheryl A. Kaplan 
Elementary Education 




"They say to me in their 

awakening, you and the 

world you live in are but a 

grain of sand upon the 

infinite shore of an infinite 

sea. 

And in my dream I say to 

them 

"I am the infinite sea, and 

all worlds are but grains of 

sand upon my shore" 



William E. Kaloust Jr. 
Elementary Education 



Dianne C Kerrissey 
Sociology 






Carroll E. Kiernan 
English 





James F. Knick Jr. 
Elementary Education 



Laura B. Komiss 
Elementary Education 





Bettina A. Krainin 
Philosophy 



William S. Kraus 
Business Administration 





Barry S. Kurtz 
Business Administration 



Richard W. Lalor 
Elementary Education 





Donald H. Langley 
Business Administration 



Daniel A. Lanzetta HI 
Government 



The goal 
of the game 
is to 

get out of 
the game. 




Leonard J. Leibowitz 
History 



Stephen M. Lundvall 
History 





Donald M. MacMeekii 
Government 



FACULTY NOT PICTURED: 

William L. Mayo 
Education 

John D. Coughlin 
Education 

Stephen S. Howe 
Education 

James G. Salvucci 
Education 

Joan S. Thrower 
Education 

Frances H. Jacobs 
Sociology 

Ann P. Levin 
Sociology 

Claudine Hogarth 
French 




From Left: John F. Riordan, Jr., Physical Education; William J. McKeown, Physical 
Education; Thomas Pileski. 



Tamara Moissey 
Language Lab Curator 

Lucile M.C. Weston 
Biology 

Francesco Rapuano 
Business 

Roger Allan Bump 
Radio-TV 

Arthur S. Smith 
History 

Gerald D. Hilyard 
Psychology 

Barbara Draimin 
Physical Education 




Pauline C Gallagher, 
Education 



Gwynne W. Katz 
Education 



Joseph C. Donavan 
Physical Education 





.-*ffJKi 




Robert E. MacNeil 
Speech 





Sherolyn J. Mahoney 
Elementary Education 



Lawrence D. Malinowski 
Sociology 





Martha A. Manning 
Elementary Education 



Joyce K. Margolis 
Sociology 





Susan E. Martin 
Elementary Education 



Thomas J. Martin 
Communicative Arts and 
Sciences 



Stephen O. McCafferty 
Business Administration 



James K. McKenna 
Government 



One thing has 

become quite clear, 

all acquaintances 

are passing. 

Therefore I 

want to make 

the most 

of every contact. 

I want to 

quickly get 

close to 

the people 

I meet because 

my experience 

has shown me 

we won't be 

together 

long. 





Robert F. Mavageri 
Psychology 



I live 

from 

one 

tentative 

conclusion 

to 

the 

next 

thinking 

each 

one 

is final. 

The only 

thing I 

know for 

sure is 

that I 

am confused. 



David J. McCullough 
Business Administration 



John McNamara 
Business Administration 



John J. Mele 

Business Administration 



Robert J. Monk 
History 



Only once 
have I 
been made 
mute. 
It 

was 
when 
a man 
asked 
me, 
"Who 
are 
you?" 




m 



Carl H. Miranda 
Business Administration 





Dean A. Morgenstern 
Psychology 



Daniel T. Mullen Jr. 
English 





Michael B. Ohanian 
Economics 



Roger W. Palmariello 
Business Administration 





Henry J. Quagenti, Jr 
Government 



Jean R. Raboff 
Psychology 





Anthony M. Regitano 
Government 



George C. Reid IV 
English 



"If fraternal love held all 
men bound, how beautiful 
this world would be." 




Richard A. Reid 
Business Administration 



Slave Sale — Wine Tasting 





3^ 3 

■ -*y . ' k. 

r kl 

The Rites Of Spring 



Nathaniel Reidel 
Government 





Janet E. Riley 
Elementary Education 



Renee E. Renda 
Elementary Education 





J 



David W. Roberts 
Psychology 



Betsy tvl Robinovitz 
Psychology 





Michael B. Robinson 
Business Administration 



Mark H. Rudolph 
Elementary Education 





Anita M. Rupner 
Elementary Education 



Joseph I. Sabella 
Economics 



"I wanted only to try to 
live in accord with the 
promptings which came 
from my true self. Why 
was that so very difficult?' 




Barbara L. Sadler 
Elementary Education 



Michael J. Sansone 
History 





John J. Santilli 
Business Administration 



Eugene J. Schaefer, Jr. 
History 





Renee J. Scheiber 
English 



Robert B. Schiavi 
Psychology 




"Unless I accept my faults, 
I will most certainly doubt 
my virtues" 



Alan J. Schultz 
Sociology 



Deborah M. Sexton 
History 






Marilyn F. Shaughnessy 
Psychology 



Jon P. Shorey 
Biology 



"This is the one way, and the other is the same, not in movement 
but abstention from movement; while the world moves . . ." 



Robert C. Shuman 
Business Administration 



Peggy A. Silfen 
Elementary Education 





Donald E. Smith 
Communicative Arts and 
Sciences 



Patricia S. Soares 
Elementary Education 




Andrew L. Strassburger 
Chemistry 



m y 



■ ■ ■ ■ 





Haig derMarderosian — Speech 



Pamela Spencer — Psychology 




Carlton Condit — Geology 



Mark W. Strodel 
Economics 





Douglas S. Stuart, Jr. 
Psychology 



James W. Sugden 
History 



And ye shall go forth . . . 
and conquer 



what ye may 



Dale F. Thistle 
Government 



Paul A. Thistle 
Sociology 





Deborah M. Thompson 
Sociology 



Paul F. Tierney 
Business Administration 





Harold A. Tubman 
Government 



Robert M. Turco 
Economics 





Harvey P. Turner 
English 



Joseph M Ventrone 
Government 





James P. Verdon 
History 



Cecile S. Verdrager 
Elementary Education 





Ellyn M. Weinberg 
Elementary Education 



Bradford W. Williams 
Chemistry 





Christine T. Winn 
Elementary Education 



Margaret P. Wolfe 
Elementary Education 




Paul H. Wujack 
Communicative Arts and 
Sciences 




Edward W. Zaleski 
Government 





Thomas J. Duggan 
Business Administration 



"Your children are not your children. . . . 
You may give them your love but 

not your thoughts, 
For they have their own thoughts. 
You may house their bodies but not 

their souls, 
For their souls dwell in the house of 

tomorrow, which you cannot visit, 

not even in your dreams. 
You may strive to be like them, but 

seek not to make them like you. 
For life goes not backward nor tarries 

with yesterday." 

Gibran 



Quotes do not pertain to specific individuals — they, and the grey squares are 
to fill spaces where seniors pictures should have been — some quotes are only 
partial ones. 







I 



fejigas 




e~^ 



The Wall Street Journal Student Achievement Award 
Recipient — Marc A. Harris 

The English Prize 

Recipient — Wayne Bovi 

The History Award 

Recipient — John P. Brunelli 

The Communication Arts and Sciences Award 
Recipient — Peter Brown Ewald 

The New Era Award 

Recipient — Robert John Bray 




This year's commencement cer- 
emonies, which are to be held on 
May 30 at 11 a.m. mark a new era 
in the history of Curry College. 
This is the first year that seniors 
will be graduating from this col- 
lege as an accredited institution. 

Over 140 academic degrees will 
be awarded, as well as 17 cer- 
tificates to graduates of Curry's 
unique Learning Disabilities pro- 
gram. Another first will see the 
college granting honorary doctor- 
ate degrees in more varied fields 
than in past years. 

As has been the custom in past 
years, the ceremony will be held 
on the Academic Quadrangle 
under a huge tent. Each senior has 
been given ten engraved invita- 
tions, but anyone who wishes, 
may attend. 




Several Innovations 

The Class of 1971 has decided 
to break tradition in three 
different ways by initiating several 
innovative ideas. 

The class has decided that there 
will be no valedictorian this year. 
They have elected a Senior Orator, 
Mr. Robert Bray, who will deliver 
the customary oration. The class 
feels that they want to have a per- 
son speak who is representative of 
the class, without making aca- 
demic achievement the prime 
criteria. 

Also new this year will be a 
hooding ceremony which will 
occur at the podium. The seniors 
will receive their academic hoods 
as their symbol of academic 
achievement. The hooding chores 
will be handled by Dean of Men, 
Robert Capalbo, and Senior Class 
President Donald Mitchell. 
New Era Award 




The attainment of accreditation 
has led the class to yet another 
break from tradition. After many 
hours of serious debate and soul 
searching, the class decided that 
they will not be giving the college 
a class gift. Instead, in comme- 
moration of accreditation, the 
class will present the "New Era 
Award," an award which will be 
presented at every commencement 
from this year forward. 

New C.A.S. Award 

The Communications Arts and 
Sciences Award joins the English, 
History, and Student Achievement 
in the Wall Street Journal awards 
which are always presented. 



Nineteen seventy-one marks the 92nd year of the existence 
of Curry College. More importantly, it marks the beginning 
of a new era. This new era indicates a new phase of educa- 
tion, a new spirit of life for an old college. Curry has dis- 
carded its educational treadmill and has found a new direc- 
tion. Yet 1971 must not also mark the end of her develop- 
ment and thus end the new era that it began. 

It would be very easy for this college to sit back on its new 
achievements and coast as it did for so many years. Rationali- 
zation of this would be equally as easy, after 92 years of 
work a rest is certainly in order. Yet it is the implicit respon- 
sibility of every person gathered here to see that Curry is 
never allowed to stall. Educational stagnation smothers every- 
one that it comes in contact with. 

The strengths that Curry has built and drawn upon are 
many. Her faculty has increased in quality as well as size. 
Her campus has more than doubled and new buildings have 
gone from blueprint to construction. These things are com- 
mendable, but there are many things at Curry College that 
are not commendable, things that must be changed if her 
long journey is to be made worthwhile. 

To this day Curry has neglected to draw upon her greatest 
assest, the asset that can insure her unending success or rele- 
gate her to eternal mediocrity. The asset to which I refer sits 
here today and every graduation day — it is, of course, Cur- 
ry's student body. The potential strength of this asset goes far 
beyond new buildings or a beautiful campus with freshly 
mowed grass. 

When President Hafer can stand up and say "Look at what 
Curry students and aJumni have done", instead of "See how 
nice our grass is", at that point, and only that point will 
Curry College ever be able to take her place as a fully actual- 
ized college. 

The student body is the great resource that administrative 
policies have failed to tap because they did not believe that 
there was anything worth listening to. But we are here and 
must not and cannot be evaded any longer. 

At present the students are allowed to elect members to all 
faculty committees. This is good but not good enough for 
students have distinct minority status on these committees. 
This is tokenism; not equality. 

There should be students on the President's Staff and the 
Board of Trustees. These two bodies control nearly every 
aspect of life at this school. They make decisions concerning 
enrollment, tuition, space usage, hiring, firing, and the list 
goes on endlessly. In every case the student is left playing 
administrative "Follow the Leader". 

To the President's Staff, student representation would sup- 
ply much needed first hand knowledge, but more important- 
ly, fresh and viable ideas to a group that otherwise might 
become tempered by bureaucracy. 

The power of the Board of Trustees is unquestionable and 
undeniable, but not sacred. It seems paradoxical that of all 
the decision making committees, this is the most powerful 
and also the most alienated. In the torrid face of today's 
world, the only way one can know about a college and its life 
is to live at and with that college. Our trustees do not live 
here at Curry and thus they would benefit tremendously by 
meeting and working with the students whose fates they con- 
trol. Reasons against these ideas are outdated, weak, or 
non-existent. A college can no longer try to solve today's 



problems and build tomorrow's futures with yesterday's solu- 
tions. They won't work. 

When students are permitted to sit on these committees, 
Curry will begin to move. It will be here that students will 
innovate and help solve problems that Curry finds herself in. 
The student members of these committees will be able to 
responsibly react to certain situations to which they now are 
afforded little voice. 

Students on these committees will be able to point out de- 
plorable situations and call for solutions. Situations such as 
incompetent employees that drain their tuition and push it 
upward. 

This type of situation cannot be tolerated. This school is 
made up of a nucleus of students who live here as well as 
learn here. It is of utmost importance that these people live in 
conditions that are suitable and conducive to a college educa- 
tion. The college catalogue states that Curry is a residential 
institution, yet her college psychiatrist has declared our dor- 
mitories to comprise the worst living conditions of any dor- 
mitories in the greater Boston area. 

Inefficient ancillary services such as maintenance and secu- 
rity departments only serve to detract from all aspects of life 
here. Both of these departments contain a select few who 
competently do their jobs. These men are highly outnum- 
bered by the others who are content to run around dodging 
responsibility. 

The maintenance men follow the example of their director 
who many times has been publically exposed for complete 
disconcern for the duties that his job entails. His department 
cost the College $270,000 last year and I challenge him to le- 
gitimately account for the expenditure of this money. I pro- 
pose that the only thing he is maintaining is his job and 
that is at tremendous cost to the students. Irresponsibility is 
bad enough when it comes cheaply, but at this price it is 
unbearable! 

Our Security Force parallels maintenance remarkably. 
Again, with a few exceptions, this group is made up of men 
who could only be admired by the Keystone Cops. Their dis- 
organization provides hilarious entertainment for those who 
observe them. But $60,000 is a great deal of money to pay for 
entertainment! We have Security men who would rather sweep 
the road instead of do the job they are paid for. Students 
cannot allow this service to be sponsored by Curry College. 
We are being robbed by own own Security and have no one 
who will listen to our cries for help. 

Curry must utilize all of her strengths to their fullest ex- 
tent. She cannot afford to carry extra employees who do not 
perform their jobs adequately yet, at the same time, she can- 
not afford to neglect ideas and talent that she has now. An 
innovative thinker, whether he be a student, an administrator, 
or a professor must not be trampled by the bureaucratic pa- 
rade. It is time that we stop and recognize what we have, lis- 
ten to them, and let them help, instead of spending time and 
effort trying to ignore them. If we don't, we will lose them and 
another hope for Curry College's new era. 

It would be easy at this time to catalogue every group or 
individual that I think is not performing his job sufficiently. 
Some might argue that a derogatory Hit Parade serves no 
purpose. However, some problems are so overwhelming that 
they must be exposed. They demand the glare of publicity. I 
will now illuminate some of these in the hope that by so 



doing steps will be taken to correct them. 

For example, how is tenure granted at Curry College? Stu- 
dents are completely excluded from the selection process. 
Students pay the salaries so shouldn't they have the right to 
participate in the determination of which faculty members get 
lifetime contracts? 

There are presently 10 tenured professors at Curry. Their 
average age is approximately 55 and the average salary is 
approximately $10,000. Assuming that they teach for another 
10 years, the administration has committed one million dol- 
lars to these people! The student body did not have a deter- 
mination in the commitment of these resources. There was no 
consultation with the students and yet it is the students, pre- 
sent and future, who have to bear the twofold burden of 
these decisions. We must bear the financial burden but more 
importantly we must bear the quality of education that these 
people are capable of imparting. 

We have faculty members who openly admit that they 
teach at high school levels and yet they are maintained at this 
institution, which calls itself a college. How can students and 
parents be expected to pay for service that does nothing but 
perpetuate mediocrity? Is it any wonder that with this qual- 
ity of instruction our students perform at a substantially in- 
ferior level when they take objective examinations such as the 
Graduate Record Exams? 

Also, we have no need for faculty members who clutch 
their books in one hand and their car keys in the other so 
that they may escape right after their classes. A suitcase pro- 
fessor benefits no one but himself. 

In taking the faculty as a whole, they are not known as 
educational innovators nor challengers of administrative au- 
thority. They have made themselves slaves to administrative 
fiat because they have not had the courage to assert the in- 
herent freedoms of all faculty bodies. 

Only recently they voted to continue the exculsion of stu- 
dents from attending their monthly meetings. Are they so 
insecure that they can't bear to face the only people to whom 
they are responsible? 

Curry's administration is by no means exempt from similar 
careful questioning. Every administrator must assume respon- 
sibility for the decisions that he has made. They must ac- 
knowledge their mistakes as well as their successes. Those 
Who bask in the glory of accreditation and past achievements 
must not use this to conceal past failure or present shortcom- 
ings. Never must this success be used as an excuse for failure 
to continue the growth of this college and the accomplish- 
ments of this class. 

Legitimate student demands that may only be granted by 
administrative agreement cannot be forestalled by administra- 
tors denying the authority that is vested in them by virtue of 
their offices nor can they pass the buck to the Board of Trus- 
tees or other administrative officials. Gelatinous administra- 
tors must not be tolerated by the student body! 

Curry's new direction must come from a genuine effort to 
change policy, and, if necessary, personnel. I am not calling 
for a witch hunt but changes where it is notoriously obvious 
that changes are demanded. Curry College has not arrived at 
the top, accreditation or no accreditation. To think that she 
has is only optimistic myopia from which no one benefits. 

The questions that face this college are simple, the answers 
difficult, but not impossible. Here redirection must be as 



much philosophical as mechanical. It is not enough to correct 
the problems without adjusting the ideas or philosophies that- 
caused them. This school must not be run in a manner that 
facilitates the efficiency of its bureaucracy. The most impor- 
tant concern must be the students — not the dollar! Students 
have the unique position of being the chief investors as well 
as the only product. This qualifies them to share in the policy 
making, both administrative as well as academic. To further 
deny them this right is to modify Curry's new direction. 

The chief responsibility for the continuing development of 
Curry College lies with each student and alumnus. We must 
seek reform and change through every possible avenue. 

Student government must cease being a social club filled 
with people content to mimic the policies of the college ad- 
ministration or act impulsively without benefit of thought or 
advice. The student body must control the student govern- 
ment. Students cannot allow unfavorable conditions, adminis- 
trative or academic, to go unquestioned. When student con- 
cern meets illogical resistance, it must not give up. Instead it 
must force itself into being not just heard, but carefully and 
fairly considered. 

It is now time to set new goals and plans for attaining 
them. Every facet of this college — from President to Grounds 
keeper — is subject to careful scrutiny. Our new era must be 
carefully defined and then each individual and department 
must measure up. Anyone that does not meet the standard 
must be replaced. The evaluation committee that came on our 
campus last fall must never be allowed to leave. Irresponsi- 
bility, no matter at what level, must be eliminated. 

The new era of Curry College began with the Class of 
1971. This class has stepped boldly forward where others 
stood still. The bulk of the load now falls to the people who 
are staying after we leave. These people — students, faculty, 
administration, and staff — must become a cohesive commu- 
nity with one interest — the advancement of the students. 
Even as this class leaves the campus it must be realized that 
they never leave this college. Every success or failure that we 
experience reflects back directly to this school. What we do, 
started here and will eventually end here. Curry must realize 
that she cannot slight the students and expect to escape un- 
marred. There are no financial, administrative, or academic 
short cuts. Curry can't waste time looking for them. Only 
when all concerned realize this can we go forward. 

Is it unreasonable to ask people to do the jobs for which 
they are paid? Is it unreasonable to expect people to take in- 
terest in their jobs and in the welfare of this College? If the 
answers to these questions are "Yes" then it is time to roll up 
the grass and call it an era. The whole game will not have 
been worth it. If the students allow these attitudes to contin- 
ue, then they are more to blame than anyone. 

Curry College must be forced to grow and not just expand. 
Our college can now take a step forward or crumble back. 
The direction is in the hands of the students. They must 
demand what they want and deserve what they get. 

Robert John Bray 



SPECIAL PATRONS 



MR. & MRS. WILLIAM B. BELCHER 
MR. & MRS. EDWARD H. BENEDICT 
MR. & MRS. ROBERT BLADIS 
MR. & MRS. DAVID S. CHICK 
MR. & MRS. JOSEPH I. GIRARDI JR. 
MR. & MRS. S. KADIN 
MR. & MRS. LOUIS D. MARECHAL 
MR. & MRS. GEORGE PARDUN 
MR. & MRS. FOSTER W. PECK 
MR. & MRS. A. L. RANDALL 
HON. & MRS. ROCCO P. REGITANO 
DR. & MRS. HENRY W.SETZER 
MR. & MRS. MAX G. STRIAR 



Patrons 



Mi. & Mrs ^Robert A. Abeles 



Americo M. Cruz 



Bill & Mary Adario 



Mr. & Mrs. R. A. Cunningham 



Mr. <Sh Mrs. Albert Aliciene 



Mr. & Mrs. William H. Davis 



Mrs. Dolores Anderson 



M. Defillipo Family 



Anonymous 



Mr. & Mrs. Saul J. Demsey 



Mr. & Mrs. Karl Arakelian 



Mr. & Mrs. Hugo A. Derocchi 



Helen Archer 



Mr. & Mrs. Charles Dimotta 



Mr. & Mrs. Robert Barbieri 



Mr. & Mrs. Leroy Doolittle 



The Beldens 



Mr. & Mrs. R. F. Ellsworth 



Madeline Bennett 



Mr. & Mrs. John G. Ermantinger 



Mr. & Mrs. Howard C. Benson 



Mr. & Mrs. Morris H. Factor & Family 



Mr. & Mrs. Albert L. Bisaccia 



Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Fallon — Needham 



Mr. & Mrs. Melvin Blau 



Dr. Newton E. Faulkner 



Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. Branagan 



Jerrald Fleishman 



Mr. & Mrs. William W. Brett 



Joseph L. Flynn 



William A. Brobston 



Dr. & Mrs. Leonard H. Garner 



Elsie A. Brown 



Mr. & Mrs. Charles H. Gedge 



Virgil Carroll 



Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Gesuelle 



Mr. & Mrs. Leon Chapin 



Mr. & Mrs. George Giromini 



Mr. & Mrs. D. Cocuzza 



Dr. & Mrs. M. Goldstein 



Don Cohen (Junior Senator) 



Stan & Fran Goldstein 



Compliments of a Friend 



Mr. & Mrs. Joseph J. Gordon 



Compliment of a Friend 



Mr. & Mrs. R. M. Green 



Mrs; George L.. Connor 



Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Guglielmo 



Rose Cosentiho 



Mr. & Mrs. Dyar Haddad 



Mr & Mrs. John A Creighton 



Mrs. Walter Haines, Sr. 



Patrons 



Mr. & Mrs. Allan E. Harding 



Dr,.& Mrs. John W>. Lyons 



Mr. & Mrs. Edward G. Hettich 



Mr. & Mrs, Thomas MacMeekiri 



Holden F. Hills 



Herbert T. Maries . 



Winifred A. Holley 
Donald B. Horton 



Mr & Mrs. .Donald S. McNeil 



Mr. & Mrs. -William F. Meara, Jr 



Mrs. John A. Hungerford 



Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Meers 



Dr. & Mrs. Frederick F. Jenkins 



Mr. & Mrs: . W. : J. Meilih 



Mr. & Mrs. Edward Jevarjian 



Mr. & Mrs : . William L. Miller 



Mr. & Mrs. John P. Jones 



Mr. & Mrs. Norbert E. Mitchell 



Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Judge 



Mr. & Mrs. Sal Morano 



Mr. & Mrs. Arnold Kahn 



Mr. & Mrs. Peter M. Morosini 



Mr. & Mrs. William E. Kaloust 



Mr. & Mrs. Julius F. Morton 



Mr. & Mrs. Howard Kandel 



E. Muran Co., Boston, Mass. 



John Kaspar, Jr. 
Mrs. Bessie Kerzner 



Mr. & Mrs. C. L. Nenninger 
Laverne & Edward Nolan 



Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Killin 



Mr. & Mrs. Francis W. Nugent, Sr. 



Mr. & Mrs. John H. Kimball 



Mr. & Mrs. Joseph C. O'Brien 



Mr. & Mrs. Harry Koletsky 
Mr. & Mrs. Leo O. Komiss 



Mr. & Mrs. Charles O'Connell 
Joe & Rita O'Connell 



Dr. & Mrs. Robert I. Kraus 



Robert Olschan 



Mr. Milton Kroll 



Mr. & Mrs. Michael Ohaniah 



Mr. & Mrs. V. Kupferberg 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Lalor 



Mr, & Mrs. Peter J y Panos 
Mr. Pasqtiale Pepe 



Mr. & Mrs. J. Derby Lawrence 



Mr. & Mrs. Norman B. Petigrow 



Mr. & Mrs. John C. Lawton 



Mrs, Albert J. Petr'e'n 



Mr. & Mrs. Israel Lenzner 



Frank M Perrucelli 




Eastlanb Woolen rtbill, IFnc. 



MANUFACTURERS OF FINE WOOLENS 
CORINNA, MAINE 



1912 David P. Striar & Co. 1912 1947 Basin Mills Inc. 1947 

1928 Striar Textile Mill 1928 1951 James Striar Woolen Mill 1951 

1936 Eastland Woolen Mill, Inc. 1936 1956 S. A. Maxfield Co., Inc. 1956 

1936 Eastland Woolen Corp. 1936 



STATE STREET BANK AND 
TRUST COMPANY 

225 FRANKLIN STREET 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS! 



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Mr. Lawrence Arch, Vice President 

State Street Bank and Trust Company 

631 VFW Parkway - Westbrook Branch 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 02167 




The BOSTON PATRIOTS 



FOOTBJUJL CM.UB 

78 LANSDOWNE STREET 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02215 






%>ucdi'%tUlou*& 



• UNITED STATES • CANADA • MEXICO 



t "'' £?/tahZfyi~ Xaucwuf £Lft&t~ 




GROUP TOURS and HOTEL RESERVATIONS 
. . . CHARTER BUS SERVICE 



BRUSH HILL TRANSPORTATION COMPANY 

109 NORFOLK STREET, DORCHESTER 436-4100 

Agents for Plymouth and Brockton St. Rwy. Company 




PS1-C0LA 



PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY 

DIVISION OF 

Charles C. Copeland Co., Inc. 

1131 Randolph Avenue • Milton, Mass. 02186 



Hayes-Bickford Lunch System, 



Inc. 

32 Garrison Street 
Boston, Mass, 02116 



157 



Contract Sales, Inc. 



Creators of Selective Interiors 



17 Deerfield Street 
Boston, Mass, 02215 



ben 
soep 



COMPANY, 'INC. • 163 ADAMS STREET • MALDEN, MASS., 02148 



Morgan Linen Service, Inc. 



941 Massachusetts Ave. 
Boston, Mass. 02118 



Anthony Ventu 



Phone 387-6530 



EVERETT SQUARE SPORTING GOODS 
<WfioLiaL and cattail Outfittzu 



Everett 
Dquar 



427 BroaJv 



a X 



Lverett, /Mass. 



158 



Mr. Harley N. Trice 



Patrons 



Leo W. Pfeiffer 



Dr. & Mrs. Jerome F] Uchirj. 



Paul K. Plakias, Attorney 



George H.. Wathey 



The Possels 



Robert Mark Weber 



Mr. & Mrs. Robert P. Quinn 



Mrs: -H. Weinerow 



Mr. & Mrs. Roy W. Reach 



■M: ■"■©.;' Wilkins 



Mr. & Mrs. George C. Reid III 



Mrs. William. B. Young 



Daniel R. Reidel 



Mr. & Mrs. John Reidy 
Mr. & Mrs. Fred T. Reilly 
Mr. & Mrs. Elliot H. Riley 
Mr. & Mrs. David J. Roberts 



Mr. & Mrs. Norman Rosen 



Mr. & Mrs. Al Samuels 



Peter L. Sapienza, M.D. 
Mr. & Mrs. E. J. Schaefer 
Family of Renee Scheiber 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Scully 



Mr. & Mrs. W. Dorsey Smith 



Mr. & Mrs. Donald Snow, Jr. 



Ben & Miriam Soep 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert R. Spencer 



Mr. & Mrs. Sheldon Stelzer 




Mr. & Mrs. William T. Summers 



John P. Thomas 






Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Tubman 





1/6 of the Juniors 



1/4 of the Sophomores 



1/6 of the Freshmen 




\m i m a vm*& wmm na a ~±jmz ibm 



Senate Holds 
Installation 

The Student Senate Inauguration 
was held the evening of May 4, 1970 
in the Senate offices. 

Outgoing and incoming senators 
were present. After the ceremony a 
small reception was held. Dean Kak- 
ascik and Dr. Keighton (Senate Advi- 
sor) were also present. 




Incoming and outgoing Senate Executive Board. Anthony Filiberto, J. Bruce Flaig, Sally 
Pugliese, Willard Horn, Helen Archer, (seated) Joseph Ventrone, Michael Stone. 





BASE 



Opponents 



Record of the 1970 Baseball Season 16 wins 
Twenty-second consecutive winning season 



5 losses 



Curry 


4 


New York Tech 


12 


Curry 


2 


New York Tech 


1 


Curry 


2 


Roger Williams 





Curry 


8 


Nasson College 


5 


Curry 


7 


Hawthorne College (13 innings) 


6 


Curry 


3 


Husson College 


14 


Curry 


9 


Farleigh Dickinson 





Curry 


5 


Farleigh Dickinson 


2 


Curry 


13 


Emerson College 


3 


Curry 


11 


Belknap College 


5 


Curry 


12 


Barrington College 


7 


Curry 


8 


Hawthorne College 


2 


Curry 


6 


Plymouth N.H. State College 


2 


Curry 


4 


Plymouth N.H. State College 


14 


Curry 


12 


Belknap College 


11 


Curry 


17 


Emerson College 


7 


Curry 


1 


Husson College 


6 


Curry 


4 


Suffolk University (10 innings) 


5 


Curry 


8 


Roger Williams College 


5 


Curry 


4 


Fitchburg State College 





Curry 


9 


Fitchburg State College 






The 1970 baseball season was one 
of Curry's best years under Coach 
Vallely whose squad had a record 
of 16 wins and only 5 losses. The 




» 




^* 




BALL 



team was very productive in runs 
scored, averaging a little better 
than seven a game. They look to 
another winning season in 1971. 




. . . Where It All Took Place 







. . . And Where PEOPLE Took Part 



165 




M 



HOW'S THE WORLD 
TREATING YOU? 



Thetas Spring 1970 








CURRY COLLEGE 



LETTER WINNERS 



Peter Alpaugh 
Thomas Bannister 
Robert Barbieri 
Edward Benedict 
George Canfield 
Geoffrey Crowther 
Richard D'Alessio 
Jeff Davies 



Robert Bockman 
James Callahan 
Kevin Donnelly 
Samuel Gelb 
Ronald Goldman 
Gordon Goldstein 



Stephen Brown 
Joseph Cacciotore 
Alan Factor 
James Kingsley 



FOOTBALL 

Steven Evans 
Gregory Fallon 
Dennis Flavin 
Douglas Fazzalore 
Ignatius Giangregorio 
Gordon Goldstein 
William Kaloust, co-Capt. 
William MacDonald 

BASEBALL 

Stephen Kavovit 
Robert Kelley 
John McNamara 
Gary Meixner 
James Monterimuro 
Alan Moulton 
Richard Petersen 

BASKETBALL 

Kevin Lally 

John McNamara 

Craig Moore 

Alan Moulton, co-Capt. 

Richard Reid 



Raymond Mazzella 
Charles Nolan, co-Capt. 
Ralph Potente 
David Sauro 
Paul Short 
Brian Silveira 
Frank Thomasino 
Richard Wallace 



Henry Quagenti 
Richard Reid 
Robert Saxe 
James Sulesky 
Frank Thomasino 
William Ullman 



Raymond Richardson 
Eugene Schaefer, co-Capt. 
James Sulesky 
Frank Thomasino 



GOLF 

Charles .Bruce 
Theodore Goldman 
John Guiney 
William Kaloust 



Robert Maxwell 
Joseph O'Brien 
Bruce Ohanian 
Paul Sutherland 



Daniel Fisher 
Richard Hebard 



TENNIS 

John Lawton 
Lawrence Marechal 
Porter Mulford 



William Pfeiffer 
Joseph Walker 



Irene Bledel 
Nanci Cohen 
Susan Costa 



CHEERLEADERS 

Anna DeCamp 
Alix Greenblat 
Ralary Laubaugh 



Carol MacDonald 
Lillian Orchard, Capt. 
Cassie Owens 



ANNUAL ALL SPORTS BANQUET 



May 15, 1970 





SPEAKER 
WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY, JR. 



GRADUATION 
1970 





. . In Spite Of 
The Strike 





What's it like to be editor of the yearbook? For some it is status, but actually it 
means hard work. It almost requires attendance at every school function. It means 
getting up in the wee hours of the morning to go to a hockey practice, and sched- 
uling pictures when nobody comes. Fighting with seniors to have their pictures 
taken and then spending weeks chasing after the official Senior list and their ma- 
jors is part of it too. 



But it's fun too. There are 
conferences at which to meet 
people from other schools 
and exchange ideas, and you 
get to meet professionals in 
the photography and publish- 
ing fields. It is a learning pro- 
cess also. Thus I extend my 
thanks to Ken Murphy and 
his staff of Dodge-Murphy 
studios; and to Robert Mur- 
phy, our representative from 
Josten's American Yearbook 
Company. 




I would also like to extend my 
special thanks to the seniors 
who took a real interest in the 
book. To Bob Carapella, 1970 
Editor who was valuable as my 
Advising Editor; to Don Mitch- 
ell, Senior Class President; to Joe 
Ventrone for himself; and to 
Nina Harding for her talents — 
my thanks. To all the other sen- 
iors and to the different secretar- 
ies of the college who also 
helped, again thanks. 



Underclassmen also had a hand in making this book successful. At the top of 
the list is my Associate Editor Bob Meers, who is in training for a stint as Editor 
in his own right — of the 1972 book. This book could not have been what it is 
without the advertising solicited by Steve Brown. Randy Cotton helped in keeping 
track of where the money went to. Again, thanks to Steve Bleecker who took time 
out from his busy schedule to do many of our better layouts. 

We have tried to make this book unique. We changed type style to Palatino, 
and changed the paper stock. We spent close to $2000 on color alone, not to men- 
tion the duotones, direct lines, contour lines, reverse and overprinted black and 
white photos. We tried a new type (to Curry) of cover and printed the directory 
separate. In other words we tried to do the best we could. We hope that the image 
of Curry we captured is one you feel a part of. 



Shalom, 




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COy 




Editor 




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